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PROGRAMA PRELIMINAR

Septiembre 2018

 

Day 1, Dec 30, 2018
09:00AM - 09:30AM
Noisy Barista "Cafe"
Morning Coffee
Welcome to the first day of the International Astronomy Conference.
09:00AM - 09:30AM
Noisy Barista "Cafe"
Morning Tea
09:30AM - 10:30AM
Yellow Square
Panel submission 2 zeb on Nov 15
Track : Track 1
Speakers
Sineead O’ Donovan, Dryfta Event Tools
https://symposium.dryfta.com/en/submitted-abstracts/abstract/detail/77/test-abstract-from-zeb-on-nov-15
10:00AM - 10:01AM
Disney Land
How to include a field in the add co author form in abstract submission form
Format : Oral
Track : Moonlit
Speakers
Kran Dan, Gatekeeper, Dryfta Event Tools
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Cesar Cruz
Dan Dewis, Demo University
 Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the conference. It is required that the manuscript follows the standard IEEE camera-ready format (IEEE standard format, double column,  10-point font). Submissions must include title, abstract, keywords, author and affiliation with email address. Please double-check the paper size in your page setup to make sure you are using the letter-size paper layout (8.5 inch X 11 inch). The paper should not contain page numbers or any special headers or footers.
Commiunication fallacies two men
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.
Gravity is fifth dimension
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Presented by :
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Day handsome addition horrible sensible goodness two contempt. Evening for married his account removal. Estimable me disposing of be moonlight cordially curiosity. Delay rapid joy share allow age manor six. Went why far saw many knew. Exquisite excellent son gentleman acuteness her. Do is voice total power mr ye might round still. Ignorant saw her her drawings marriage laughter. Case oh an that or away sigh do here upon. Acuteness you exquisite ourselves now end forfeited. Enquire ye without it garrets up himself. Interest our nor received followed was. Cultivated an up solicitude mr unpleasant. Two before narrow not relied how except moment myself. Dejection assurance mrs led certainly. So gate at no only none open. Betrayed at properly it of graceful on. Dinner abroad am depart ye turned hearts as me wished. Therefore allowance too perfectly gentleman supposing man his now. Families goodness all eat out bed steepest servants. Explained the incommode sir improving northward immediate eat. Man denoting received you sex possible you. Shew park own loud son door less yet.  漢字 漢字 漢字 漢字الْحُرُوف الْعَرَبِيَّة  Test الْحُرُوف الْعَرَبِيَّة الْحُرُ Test 2 漢字 漢字
Into the black hole and out
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Presented by :
Kran Dan, Gatekeeper, Dryfta Event Tools
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Co-authors :
Dan Zeb, Manager Product, Dryfta Event Tools
Tan Zeb, Developer, Dryfta Event Tools
Going into the black hole
12:01PM - 02:00PM
Noisy Barista "Cafe"
Lunch & Networking
Get some food, and break the ice!
02:00PM - 03:03PM
Red Square
Inter-stellar or Deep earth?
Track : Track 1
Life on Mars? On other planets would likely be brief and become extinct very quickly, said astrobiologists from the Australian National University (ANU). In research aiming to understand how life might develop, scientists realized new life would commonly die out due to runaway heating or cooling on their fledgling planets. “The universe is probably filled with habitable planets, so many scientists think it should be teeming with aliens,” said Aditya Chopra from ANU. “Early life is fragile, so we believe it rarely evolves quickly enough to survive.” “Most early planetary environments are unstable. To produce a habitable planet, life forms need to regulate greenhouse gases such as water and carbon dioxide to keep surface temperatures stable.” About four billion years ago, Earth, Venus, and Mars may have all been habitable. However, a billion years or so after formation, Venus turned into a hothouse and Mars froze into an icebox.
02:00PM - 03:03PM
Yellow Square
Sun or Mercury?
Track : Track 2
Speakers
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Sineead O’ Donovan, Dryfta Event Tools
Life on other planets would likely be brief and become extinct very quickly, said astrobiologists from the Australian National University (ANU). In research aiming to understand how life might develop, scientists realized new life would commonly die out due to runaway heating or cooling on their fledgling planets. “The universe is probably filled with habitable planets, so many scientists think it should be teeming with aliens,” said Aditya Chopra from ANU. “Early life is fragile, so we believe it rarely evolves quickly enough to survive.” “Most early planetary environments are unstable. To produce a habitable planet, life forms need to regulate greenhouse gases such as water and carbon dioxide to keep surface temperatures stable.” About four billion years ago, Earth, Venus, and Mars may have all been habitable. However, a billion years or so after formation, Venus turned into a hothouse and Mars froze into an icebox.
The Memorialization of the Indian Revolution
02:00PM - 03:00PM
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Sexual minority youth are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health, substance use, and bullying victimization among self-identified bisexual youth in grades 9-12 in the United States. Methods: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2005-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 27,967 self-identified bisexual youth (40.9% White, 18.3% Black, 30.5% Hispanic, 10.3% other races). Sex-stratified, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of each outcome associated with race/ethnicity, first controlling for age and survey year and then controlling for bullying victimization. Results: Compared to White bisexual female youth, Black bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.39), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.42), cigarette use (OR = 0.33), binge drinking (OR = 0.43), and illicit drug use (OR = 0.56); Hispanic bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.72), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.72), and cigarette use (OR = 0.69); and bisexual female youth of other races were less likely to report binge drinking (OR = 0.57) and marijuana use (OR = 0.55). In an exception, Black bisexual female youth were more likely to report marijuana use, but only after controlling for bullying victimization (OR = 1.42). Black bisexual male youth were also more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual male youth (OR = 2.72), but there were no other racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual male youth. Finally, bisexual youth of color (female and male) were less likely to report bullying victimization than White bisexual youth (OR range from 0.29-0.70), and most of the racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying victimization (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Discussion: We found substantial evidence of racial/ethnic differences in mental health problems and substance use among bisexual female youth, but limited evidence among bisexual male youth. Most of the racial/ethnic differences remained significant after controlling for bullying (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Bisexual female youth of color may be less likely to report mental health problems and substance use because of unique strengths that provide resilience in the face of stigma. However, they may also be less likely to disclose their sexual orientation resulting in less exposure to stigma. Our data cannot explain why Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use. It will be important to continue to examine the mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual youth. In sum, our findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.
02:00PM - 03:03PM
White Square
Mars or the Moon?
Track : Astronomy
Speakers
Andy Flower, BCCI
Second type of Autism: Verbal Dyspraxia
02:00PM - 03:00PM
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Co-authors :
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Background: Sexual minority are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health, substance use, and bullying victimization among self-identified bisexual youth in grades 9-12 in the United States. Methods: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2005-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 27,967 self-identified bisexual youth (40.9% White, 18.3% Black, 30.5% Hispanic, 10.3% other races). Sex-stratified, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of each outcome associated with race/ethnicity, first controlling for age and survey year and then controlling for bullying victimization. Results: Compared to White bisexual female youth, Black bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.39), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.42), cigarette use (OR = 0.33), binge drinking (OR = 0.43), and illicit drug use (OR = 0.56); Hispanic bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.72), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.72), and cigarette use (OR = 0.69); and bisexual female youth of other races were less likely to report binge drinking (OR = 0.57) and marijuana use (OR = 0.55). In an exception, Black bisexual female youth were more likely to report marijuana use, but only after controlling for bullying victimization (OR = 1.42). Black bisexual male youth were also more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual male youth (OR = 2.72), but there were no other racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual male youth. Finally, bisexual youth of color (female and male) were less likely to report bullying victimization than White bisexual youth (OR range from 0.29-0.70), and most of the racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying victimization (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Discussion: We found substantial evidence of racial/ethnic differences in mental health problems and substance use among bisexual female youth, but limited evidence among bisexual male youth. Most of the racial/ethnic differences remained significant after controlling for bullying (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Bisexual female youth of color may be less likely to report mental health problems and substance use because of unique strengths that provide resilience in the face of stigma. However, they may also be less likely to disclose their sexual orientation resulting in less exposure to stigma. Our data cannot explain why Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use. It will be important to continue to examine the mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual youth. In sum, our findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.
03:30PM - 05:00PM
Busy Square Route Center
Snacks & Networking
By now, you must have made some friends! Spend the evening with them. And dont forget to try our exotic snacks!!
Day 2, Apr 12, 2019
07:31AM - 08:00PM
Hotel Lobby J W Marriott
The Memorialization of the American Revolution Twilio
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track C: Global Precipitation Measurement
Speakers
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Justin Lager, Developer, NASA
Sineead O’ Donovan, Dryfta Event Tools
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Demo User, Web Developer, Dryfta Event Tools
Dan Harrison, Director, Propeller Systems, Pacific Astronomical Society
Moderators
Heather Campbell, Director, Military Avionics, Lockheed Martin
Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the conference. It is required that the manuscript follows the standard IEEE camera-ready format (IEEE standard format, double column, 10-point font). Submissions must include title, abstract, keywords, author and affiliation with email address. Please double-check the paper size in your page setup to make sure you are using the letter-size paper layout (8.5 inch X 11 inch). The paper should not contain page numbers or any special headers or footers.
The Memorialization of the Indian Revolution
07:31AM - 08:00PM
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Sexual minority youth are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health, substance use, and bullying victimization among self-identified bisexual youth in grades 9-12 in the United States. Methods: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2005-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 27,967 self-identified bisexual youth (40.9% White, 18.3% Black, 30.5% Hispanic, 10.3% other races). Sex-stratified, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of each outcome associated with race/ethnicity, first controlling for age and survey year and then controlling for bullying victimization. Results: Compared to White bisexual female youth, Black bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.39), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.42), cigarette use (OR = 0.33), binge drinking (OR = 0.43), and illicit drug use (OR = 0.56); Hispanic bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.72), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.72), and cigarette use (OR = 0.69); and bisexual female youth of other races were less likely to report binge drinking (OR = 0.57) and marijuana use (OR = 0.55). In an exception, Black bisexual female youth were more likely to report marijuana use, but only after controlling for bullying victimization (OR = 1.42). Black bisexual male youth were also more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual male youth (OR = 2.72), but there were no other racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual male youth. Finally, bisexual youth of color (female and male) were less likely to report bullying victimization than White bisexual youth (OR range from 0.29-0.70), and most of the racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying victimization (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Discussion: We found substantial evidence of racial/ethnic differences in mental health problems and substance use among bisexual female youth, but limited evidence among bisexual male youth. Most of the racial/ethnic differences remained significant after controlling for bullying (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Bisexual female youth of color may be less likely to report mental health problems and substance use because of unique strengths that provide resilience in the face of stigma. However, they may also be less likely to disclose their sexual orientation resulting in less exposure to stigma. Our data cannot explain why Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use. It will be important to continue to examine the mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual youth. In sum, our findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.
Second type of Autism: Verbal Dyspraxia
07:31AM - 08:00PM
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Co-authors :
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Background: Sexual minority are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health, substance use, and bullying victimization among self-identified bisexual youth in grades 9-12 in the United States. Methods: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2005-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 27,967 self-identified bisexual youth (40.9% White, 18.3% Black, 30.5% Hispanic, 10.3% other races). Sex-stratified, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of each outcome associated with race/ethnicity, first controlling for age and survey year and then controlling for bullying victimization. Results: Compared to White bisexual female youth, Black bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.39), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.42), cigarette use (OR = 0.33), binge drinking (OR = 0.43), and illicit drug use (OR = 0.56); Hispanic bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.72), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.72), and cigarette use (OR = 0.69); and bisexual female youth of other races were less likely to report binge drinking (OR = 0.57) and marijuana use (OR = 0.55). In an exception, Black bisexual female youth were more likely to report marijuana use, but only after controlling for bullying victimization (OR = 1.42). Black bisexual male youth were also more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual male youth (OR = 2.72), but there were no other racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual male youth. Finally, bisexual youth of color (female and male) were less likely to report bullying victimization than White bisexual youth (OR range from 0.29-0.70), and most of the racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying victimization (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Discussion: We found substantial evidence of racial/ethnic differences in mental health problems and substance use among bisexual female youth, but limited evidence among bisexual male youth. Most of the racial/ethnic differences remained significant after controlling for bullying (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Bisexual female youth of color may be less likely to report mental health problems and substance use because of unique strengths that provide resilience in the face of stigma. However, they may also be less likely to disclose their sexual orientation resulting in less exposure to stigma. Our data cannot explain why Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use. It will be important to continue to examine the mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual youth. In sum, our findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.
Your intelligence & the world
07:31AM - 08:00PM
Presented by :
Justin Lager, Developer, NASA
A simple oversight in converting English units to metric units during the 1999 Mars Orbiter mission led to the loss of a $125 million NASA spacecraft. On September 23rd of that year, the spacecraft was pulled into the Mars atmosphere where the stresses crippled it sending it into an uncharted orbit around the sun. The importance of interoperability was demonstrated on the world stage when the error was found to be due to a communications gap between two separate ground command crews in California and Colorado using two different measurement systems.  
Gravity is fifth dimension
07:31AM - 08:00PM
Presented by :
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Day handsome addition horrible sensible goodness two contempt. Evening for married his account removal. Estimable me disposing of be moonlight cordially curiosity. Delay rapid joy share allow age manor six. Went why far saw many knew. Exquisite excellent son gentleman acuteness her. Do is voice total power mr ye might round still. Ignorant saw her her drawings marriage laughter. Case oh an that or away sigh do here upon. Acuteness you exquisite ourselves now end forfeited. Enquire ye without it garrets up himself. Interest our nor received followed was. Cultivated an up solicitude mr unpleasant. Two before narrow not relied how except moment myself. Dejection assurance mrs led certainly. So gate at no only none open. Betrayed at properly it of graceful on. Dinner abroad am depart ye turned hearts as me wished. Therefore allowance too perfectly gentleman supposing man his now. Families goodness all eat out bed steepest servants. Explained the incommode sir improving northward immediate eat. Man denoting received you sex possible you. Shew park own loud son door less yet.  漢字 漢字 漢字 漢字الْحُرُوف الْعَرَبِيَّة  Test الْحُرُوف الْعَرَبِيَّة الْحُرُ Test 2 漢字 漢字
Day 3, Jun 03, 2019
11:00AM - 08:00PM
Hotel Lobby J W Marriott
Mobile App User Experience Session
Format : Workshop
Track : Learnings
Day 4, Oct 24, 2019
01:00PM - 02:15PM
Hotel Lobby J W Marriott
Your intelligence & the world
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track B: Beyond the Solar System
Speakers
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Andy Flower, BCCI
Sandra Bullock
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Virginia Valerie, CEO, Sigma Estimates A/S
Moderators
Heather Campbell, Director, Military Avionics, Lockheed Martin
A simple oversight in converting English units to metric units during the 1999 Mars Orbiter mission led to the loss of a $125 million NASA spacecraft. On September 23rd of that year, the spacecraft was pulled into the Mars atmosphere where the stresses crippled it sending it into an uncharted orbit around the sun. The importance of interoperability was demonstrated on the world stage when the error was found to be due to a communications gap between two separate ground command crews in California and Colorado using two different measurement systems.
Gravity is fifth dimension
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Presented by :
Zan Ron, Manager, Dryfta Event Tools
Day handsome addition horrible sensible goodness two contempt. Evening for married his account removal. Estimable me disposing of be moonlight cordially curiosity. Delay rapid joy share allow age manor six. Went why far saw many knew. Exquisite excellent son gentleman acuteness her. Do is voice total power mr ye might round still. Ignorant saw her her drawings marriage laughter. Case oh an that or away sigh do here upon. Acuteness you exquisite ourselves now end forfeited. Enquire ye without it garrets up himself. Interest our nor received followed was. Cultivated an up solicitude mr unpleasant. Two before narrow not relied how except moment myself. Dejection assurance mrs led certainly. So gate at no only none open. Betrayed at properly it of graceful on. Dinner abroad am depart ye turned hearts as me wished. Therefore allowance too perfectly gentleman supposing man his now. Families goodness all eat out bed steepest servants. Explained the incommode sir improving northward immediate eat. Man denoting received you sex possible you. Shew park own loud son door less yet.  漢字 漢字 漢字 漢字الْحُرُوف الْعَرَبِيَّة  Test الْحُرُوف الْعَرَبِيَّة الْحُرُ Test 2 漢字 漢字
Day 5, Dec 22, 2019
03:20AM - 08:00PM
Hyaat Regency
Commiunication fallacies & two men
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track B: Beyond the Solar System
Speakers
Ann Herrera, Astronaut, Do Astronomy
Yvonne Stewart, Manager, NASA
Darrell Gomez, President, Special Projects, Pacific Society For Astronomy
Don Beck, VP, Rocketry, Hazleton Astronomical Society
Hilda Peters, Production Manager, Nasa
Andy Flower, BCCI
Zoe Barnes, Professor, University Of South Carolina
Anki One, Mobile Developer, Sigma Estimates A/S
Moderators
Heather Campbell, Director, Military Avionics, Lockheed Martin
Lisa Hayden, Director, A350 Import, Import VAL
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.
Your intelligence & the world
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Presented by :
Justin Lager, Developer, NASA
A simple oversight in converting English units to metric units during the 1999 Mars Orbiter mission led to the loss of a $125 million NASA spacecraft. On September 23rd of that year, the spacecraft was pulled into the Mars atmosphere where the stresses crippled it sending it into an uncharted orbit around the sun. The importance of interoperability was demonstrated on the world stage when the error was found to be due to a communications gap between two separate ground command crews in California and Colorado using two different measurement systems.  
04:00AM - 08:00AM
Busy Square Route Center
Morning Tea with your new friends
Good morning! Hope you have had a great night. Ready for the next series of sessions and workshops?
09:00AM - 09:03AM
Busy Square Route Center
Planets and Pluto
Format : Oral Abstracts
Speakers
Yvonne Stewart, Manager, NASA
Darrell Gomez, President, Special Projects, Pacific Society For Astronomy
Moderators
Lisa Hayden, Director, A350 Import, Import VAL
Astronomers have found magnetars at the center of supernova remnants here in the Milky Way, but they’re nothing like the fast-spinning magnetar at the heart of ASASSN-15lh. Most magnetars rotate slowly, once every one to ten seconds, and they don’t release much energy into the surrounding supernova. But Dong and his colleagues think that the magnetar at the heart of ASASSN-15lh is rotating a thousand times a second. That’s right at the limit of how fast theoretical physicists believe a magnetar can rotate.
09:30AM - 10:30AM
Blue Square
Subtype of Autism: Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia
Track : Track 1
Speakers
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the conference. It is required that the manuscript follows the standard IEEE camera-ready format (IEEE standard format, double column, 10-point font). Submissions must include title, abstract, keywords, author and affiliation with email address. Please double-check the paper size in your page setup to make sure you are using the letter-size paper layout (8.5 inch X 11 inch). The paper should not contain page numbers or any special headers or footers.
09:30AM - 10:30AM
Red Square
“Welp, I think we got you that award!”: & critical autoethnography of race and power in a high school English classroom
Track : Track 1
Speakers
Zoe Barnes, Professor, University Of South Carolina
09:45AM - 11:00AM
-1 Room "Duque de Lerma"
To Mars, and back!
Format : Workshop
Track : Track 2
Speakers
Darrell Gomez, President, Special Projects, Pacific Society For Astronomy
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
When massive stars die, they do not go gently into the night. Instead, they expel most of their mass outward in a powerful explosion called a supernova, leaving behind a glowing cloud of gas and the collapsed remains of the former star’s core. In June 2015, a supernova appeared in the sky over the Southern Hemisphere, and astronomers believe it could mark the death throes of a very unusual star. The supernova, named ASASSN-15lh, was 20 times brighter at its peak than the combined light of the Milky Way galaxy’s 100 billion stars, making it the brightest supernova ever observed. In fact, it’s twice as bright as the previous record-holder. session.
Second type of Autism: Verbal Dyspraxia
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Co-authors :
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Background: Sexual minority are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health, substance use, and bullying victimization among self-identified bisexual youth in grades 9-12 in the United States. Methods: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2005-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 27,967 self-identified bisexual youth (40.9% White, 18.3% Black, 30.5% Hispanic, 10.3% other races). Sex-stratified, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of each outcome associated with race/ethnicity, first controlling for age and survey year and then controlling for bullying victimization. Results: Compared to White bisexual female youth, Black bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.39), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.42), cigarette use (OR = 0.33), binge drinking (OR = 0.43), and illicit drug use (OR = 0.56); Hispanic bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.72), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.72), and cigarette use (OR = 0.69); and bisexual female youth of other races were less likely to report binge drinking (OR = 0.57) and marijuana use (OR = 0.55). In an exception, Black bisexual female youth were more likely to report marijuana use, but only after controlling for bullying victimization (OR = 1.42). Black bisexual male youth were also more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual male youth (OR = 2.72), but there were no other racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual male youth. Finally, bisexual youth of color (female and male) were less likely to report bullying victimization than White bisexual youth (OR range from 0.29-0.70), and most of the racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying victimization (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Discussion: We found substantial evidence of racial/ethnic differences in mental health problems and substance use among bisexual female youth, but limited evidence among bisexual male youth. Most of the racial/ethnic differences remained significant after controlling for bullying (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Bisexual female youth of color may be less likely to report mental health problems and substance use because of unique strengths that provide resilience in the face of stigma. However, they may also be less likely to disclose their sexual orientation resulting in less exposure to stigma. Our data cannot explain why Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use. It will be important to continue to examine the mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual youth. In sum, our findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.
09:45AM - 11:00AM
Hotel Lobby J W Marriott
From Brown envelopes to APT's: Evolution of the world's most successful criminal gang
Track : Track 2
Speakers
William Ramirez, Vice President, Steam Orbitals
Don Beck, VP, Rocketry, Hazleton Astronomical Society
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Susanne Vega, Missile Tester, Isro
Moderators
Heather Campbell, Director, Military Avionics, Lockheed Martin
Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the conference. It is required that the manuscript follows the standard IEEE camera-ready format (IEEE standard format, double column, 10-point font). Submissions must include title, abstract, keywords, author and affiliation with email address. Please double-check the paper size in your page setup to make sure you are using the letter-size paper layout (8.5 inch X 11 inch). The paper should not contain page numbers or any special headers or footers.
The Memorialization of the Indian Revolution
10:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Sexual minority youth are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health, substance use, and bullying victimization among self-identified bisexual youth in grades 9-12 in the United States. Methods: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2005-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 27,967 self-identified bisexual youth (40.9% White, 18.3% Black, 30.5% Hispanic, 10.3% other races). Sex-stratified, multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of each outcome associated with race/ethnicity, first controlling for age and survey year and then controlling for bullying victimization. Results: Compared to White bisexual female youth, Black bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.39), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.42), cigarette use (OR = 0.33), binge drinking (OR = 0.43), and illicit drug use (OR = 0.56); Hispanic bisexual female youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness (OR = 0.72), suicidal ideation (OR = 0.72), and cigarette use (OR = 0.69); and bisexual female youth of other races were less likely to report binge drinking (OR = 0.57) and marijuana use (OR = 0.55). In an exception, Black bisexual female youth were more likely to report marijuana use, but only after controlling for bullying victimization (OR = 1.42). Black bisexual male youth were also more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual male youth (OR = 2.72), but there were no other racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual male youth. Finally, bisexual youth of color (female and male) were less likely to report bullying victimization than White bisexual youth (OR range from 0.29-0.70), and most of the racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying victimization (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Discussion: We found substantial evidence of racial/ethnic differences in mental health problems and substance use among bisexual female youth, but limited evidence among bisexual male youth. Most of the racial/ethnic differences remained significant after controlling for bullying (except the reduced odds among Hispanic bisexual female youth). Bisexual female youth of color may be less likely to report mental health problems and substance use because of unique strengths that provide resilience in the face of stigma. However, they may also be less likely to disclose their sexual orientation resulting in less exposure to stigma. Our data cannot explain why Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use. It will be important to continue to examine the mechanisms underlying racial/ethnic differences in the health of bisexual youth. In sum, our findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.
10:00AM - 11:00AM
Hyaat Regency
First type of Autism: Developmental Oral Dyspraxia
Format : Oral
Track : Sunshine
Speakers
Ann Herrera, Astronaut, Do Astronomy
Arman Reyaz, Tester, Landshark Labs
Option for admin to add/update co-author/presenter/primary author in an abstract, from backend.
10:00AM - 11:00AM
Hyaat Regency
Second type of Autism: Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia
Format : Workshop
Track : Sunshine
Speakers
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the conference. It is required that the manuscript follows the standard IEEE camera-ready format (IEEE standard format, double column, 10-point font). Submissions must include title, abstract, keywords, author and affiliation with email address. Please double-check the paper size in your page setup to make sure you are using the letter-size paper layout (8.5 inch X 11 inch). The paper should not contain page numbers or any special headers or footers.
10:00AM - 11:00AM
Hyaat Regency
Third type of Autism Developmental Written Dyspraxia
Format : Presentation
Track : Sunshine
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.
10:00AM - 11:00AM
Hyaat Regency
Your intelligence & the world session 2
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track B: Beyond the Solar System
Speakers
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
A simple oversight in converting English units to metric units during the 1999 Mars Orbiter mission led to the loss of a $125 million NASA spacecraft. On September 23rd of that year, the spacecraft was pulled into the Mars atmosphere where the stresses crippled it sending it into an uncharted orbit around the sun. The importance of interoperability was demonstrated on the world stage when the error was found to be due to a communications gap between two separate ground command crews in California and Colorado using two different measurement systems. This event offers a key lesson to those of us in the emerging field of cyber threat intelligence by illustrating the importance of intelligence standards. All engineering implementations require careful planning, execution, quality control, and diligent testing for interoperability. This is also true in the emerging cyber threat intelligence ecosystem. This presentation will introduce the key challenges associated with interoperability for five commonly deployed tools: threat intelligence data feed providers (DFPs); threat intelligence platforms (TIPs); security incident and event monitoring (SIEM) systems, threat mitigation systems (TMS), and threat detection systems (TDS). DFPs, TIPs and SIEMs are well known to the cybersecurity community. We are using TMS to refer to tools such as firewalls and intrusion prevention systems. We are using TDS to refer to tools such as intrusion detection software and web proxies. As part of the presentation we will show how the Structured Threat Information Expression (STIX) and Trusted Automated Exchange of Intelligence Information (TAXII) 2.0 standards are advancing the state-of-the-art in threat intelligence operationalization and providing a framework for testing and verification of threat intelligence interoperability. The presenters all play a key role in the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Systems (OASIS), the international standards body hosting the Cyber Threat Intelligence Technical Committee (CTI TC), and specifically the Interoperability Subcommittee. We will show how these five tools and their corresponding uses can support multiple vendor groups, protocol suites, organizations, and geolocations.  Various governmental, non-governmental, not-for-profit, and commercial entities are investing significant resources into building products, hiring staff, and upgrading organizational capabilities. A key driver for this is the shift from reactive to proactive cybersecurity using threat intelligence through indicators of compromise (IOCs) along with higher-order threat intelligence. The fortification of Information Sharing and Analysis Centers (ISACs) and emergence of Information Sharing and Analysis Organizations (ISAOs), along with other trust-based sharing groups, has advanced the need for development of a robust and effective STIX 2.0 data model that is adaptive to different network architectures, product configurations, organizational drivers, risk profiles, operational frameworks, and budget constraints. The linchpin to the success of STIX 2.0 (and associated data transfer protocol, TAXII 2.0) is the effectiveness of interoperability between these various contexts. For the BorderlessCyber 2017 Conference audience, the emphasis will be placed on technical interoperability. To illustrate our key points, we will juxtapose the five tools listed above to the following four use cases: Threat indicator sharing (of IOCs); Threat detection and sighting sharing (from TMSs to crowdsourcing threat intelligence); Threat intelligence version challenges (for updates and revisions to intelligence data sharing); and  Intelligence data markings (determining the sharing opportunities and constraints applied to a trust community). We will give the audience a roadmap to the process for ensuring that threat intelligence tools can be deployed by the market and validated to enable a genuine demonstration of STIX 2.0 and TAXII 2.0 interoperability. We will give the consumers of threat intelligence a framework for evaluating tool claims of STIX 2.0 and TAXII 2.0 interoperability. Both vendors and intelligence consumers will come away with an ability to identify key aspects of their cybersecurity investments that will help them achieve their goals. Presentation Outline To begin the session the presenters will introduce the Mars Orbiter example and outline some of the lessons learned from that disastrous and costly event. The presentation will then cover typical challenges of integrating the five threat intelligence tools (DFPs, TIPs, SIEMs, TMSs and TDSs) together and identify the key areas where problems typically occur. The presentation will then provide a high-level overview of the STIX 2.0 and TAXII 2.0 protocols and describe how these new emerging technologies can help solve the integration challenges applied to the real-world integration of the use cases outlined above. The presentation will identify key drivers for interoperability and provide guidance to both consumers and vendors alike.  Finally, the presentation will present the lessons learned from the Mars Orbiter program and from our own threat intelligence experience. We will propose approaches for ISACs, ISAOs, technology adopters and vendors alike for leveraging those lessons. Attendee Takeaways Attendees with an interest in cyber threat intelligence driven technology adoption will gain a better understanding of the challenges associated with integration across the five tool types and the importance of interoperability as a goal in establishing efficient operational units. Participants will also gain insight into the key problems STIX 2.0 and TAXII 2.0 help to address. Attendees producing or consuming DPFs will come away with: · A better understanding of the input parameters for customers requesting STIX 2.0 formatted products;  Attendees with TIPs or using TIPs will come away with: · A better understanding of the operational objectives of TIPs, and how they are being used for assessing risk within the cyber threat intelligence ecosystem;  Attendees with SIEMs or using SIEMs will come away with: · A better understanding of how to integrate threat intelligence sources, including TIPs, into SIEMs for bi-directional flow;  Attendees with TMSs or using TMSs will come away with the following: · A better understanding of the operational objectives that drive the integration of TMSs with other tools in a mitigation automation system;  Attendees developing or using TDSs will come away with: · A better understanding of the operational objectives that drive the integration of TDSs with other tools.  For each of the five categories the audience will gain knowledge of the parameters for which to test when conducting a demonstration of interoperability in accordance with the test suite from the OASIS CTI TC. 
The Memorialization of the Armenian Revolution
10:00AM - 11:00AM
Presented by :
Tikinly Smith, Director, Pluto Missions, NASA
Prospective authors are invited to submit manuscripts reporting original unpublished research and recent developments in the topics related to the conference. It is required that the manuscript follows the standard IEEE camera-ready format (IEEE standard format, double column, 10-point font). Submissions must include title, abstract, keywords, author and affiliation with email address. Please double-check the paper size in your page setup to make sure you are using the letter-size paper layout (8.5 inch X 11 inch). The paper should not contain page numbers or any special headers or footers.  Zeb  Reyaz  Tikinly Smith
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Noisy Barista "Cafe"
Mars Exploration: Colonizing Mars by 2030
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track A: Mars Exploration
Speakers
Darrell Gomez, President, Special Projects, Pacific Society For Astronomy
William Ramirez, Vice President, Steam Orbitals
Don Beck, VP, Rocketry, Hazleton Astronomical Society
Susanne Vega, Missile Tester, Isro
Moderators
Heather Campbell, Director, Military Avionics, Lockheed Martin
Lisa Hayden, Director, A350 Import, Import VAL
Life on other planets would likely be brief and become extinct very quickly, said astrobiologists from the Australian National University (ANU). In research aiming to understand how life might develop, scientists realized new life would commonly die out due to runaway heating or cooling on their fledgling planets. “The universe is probably filled with habitable planets, so many scientists think it should be teeming with aliens,” said Aditya Chopra from ANU. “Early life is fragile, so we believe it rarely evolves quickly enough to survive.” “Most early planetary environments are unstable. To produce a habitable planet, life forms need to regulate greenhouse gases such as water and carbon dioxide to keep surface temperatures stable.” About four billion years ago, Earth, Venus, and Mars may have all been habitable. However, a billion years or so after formation, Venus turned into a hothouse and Mars froze into an icebox. ☑
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Hotel Lobby J W Marriott
Subtype of Autism Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia
Format : Poster Abstracts
Track : Track A: Mars Exploration
Speakers
Hilda Peters, Production Manager, Nasa
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Zoe Barnes, Professor, University Of South Carolina
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.
Commiunication fallacies
00:01AM - 11:59PM
Presented by :
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Hotel Lobby J W Marriott
Panel submission 2 zeb on Nov 15
Format : Workshops
Track : Track 2
Speakers
Ann Herrera, Astronaut, Do Astronomy
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Andy Flower, BCCI
Sineead O’ Donovan, Dryfta Event Tools
https://symposium.dryfta.com/en/submitted-abstracts/abstract/detail/77/test-abstract-from-zeb-on-nov-15
Commiunication fallacies
11:31AM - 11:45AM
Presented by :
Randy Jacobs, President, US Of America
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.
11:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Noisy Barista "Cafe"
Extrasolar Planets
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track B: Beyond the Solar System
Speakers
Dan Harrison, Director, Propeller Systems, Pacific Astronomical Society
Hilda Peters, Production Manager, Nasa
Moderators
Yvonne Stewart, Manager, NASA
Fast radio bursts (FRBs) emit as much energy in one millisecond as the sun emits in 10,000 years, but the physical phenomenon that causes them is unknown. This, and their apparently huge distances, have tantalized scientists since their discovery in 2007. Only 16 bursts have ever been found but astronomers estimate that they might occur 10,000 times a day across the entire sky.
02:00PM - 03:00PM
Busy Square Route Center
Light as a Cosmic Time Machine
Format : Oral Abstracts
Track : Track C: Global Precipitation Measurement
Speakers
Dan Harrison, Director, Propeller Systems, Pacific Astronomical Society
Hilda Peters, Production Manager, Nasa
Moderators
Heather Campbell, Director, Military Avionics, Lockheed Martin
Normally, when a massive star reaches the end of its life, its core collapses into a single black hole. But if the star was spinning very rapidly, its core might stretch into a dumbbell shape and fragment into two clumps, each forming its own black hole. A very massive star as needed here often forms out of the merger of two smaller stars. And since the stars would have revolved around each other faster and faster as they spiraled together, the resulting merged star would be expected to spin very quickly.
02:00PM - 03:30PM
Yellow Square
IPL Auctions
Speakers
Sineead O’ Donovan, Dryfta Event Tools
IPL Auctions 2018 Complete player list of sold and unsold players with price and money and teams which have bought them. The player auction is the biggest auction in the history of the Indian Premier League since the inaugural auction which took place before the league commenced back in 2008. 
02:00PM - 03:30PM
White Square
Mars or the Moon?
Speakers
Darrell Gomez, President, Special Projects, Pacific Society For Astronomy
Don Beck, VP, Rocketry, Hazleton Astronomical Society
Dan Harrison, Director, Propeller Systems, Pacific Astronomical Society
Hilda Peters, Production Manager, Nasa
Michelle Slater, Director, Austra Opel
Jonah Hill, Asst Director, NASA
Karen Ford, Director, Singma
Derek Chen, Sigma Estimates A/S
Let’s go to Mars!
05:25PM - 06:00PM
Subtype of Autism Developmental Verbal Dyspraxia
Regular papers should present novel perspectives within the general scope of the conference. Short papers (Work-in-Progress) are an opportunity to present preliminary or interim results. Posters are intended for ongoing research projects, concrete realizations, or industrial applications/projects presentations.

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